Andreas and Kathrin View towards the illuminated winery at night Barrique storage People at manual wine harvest Rows of grapevines in summer, about 1 month befor the harvest Late harvest while the leafes show first autumn colours Hillside vineyard with autumn colored leafes Barrique casks View towards the winery Sonnenmulde wine bottles Sun rises through ground fog while wind turbines tower above the vineyards Trailer filled with fresh grapes at the harvest View of vineards starting to change leafe colours in autumn Vineyard next to a forest, autumn colored leafes Autumn colored vineyards around Gols

Yield Management - Grape thinning.

2019-07-24 - 16:55

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Grapes and leaves removed for grape thinning.
Grapes and leaves removed for grape thinning.

Yield management is a key factor in making great wines. The most important decisions are already made during winter pruning. But now, with the harvest in sight, it is time for some fine-tuning. Depending on the grape variety, there is more or less to do. But thinning the yield to a level that will help us harvest grapes with the ripeness we need, is what really counts.


weigelt vines before thinning.
weigelt vines before thinning.

The Images show Zweigelt grapes before and after thinning. Zweigelt profits exceptionally from reducing the yield, altough this example might be a bit radical. But these grapes are intended for our premium barrique wine, Capella. Only the best, free hanging grapes are kept and only one per shoot is allowed. This is a prerequisit for a full bodied, dark coloured and expressive red wine and Capella should be just that.


Zweigelt vines after thinning. Only the best grapes remain.
Zweigelt vines after thinning. Only the best grapes remain.

Thinning is the last “green-work” to do in the vineyard before the harvest. In August the grapes just ripen and we prepare for the harvest. We might even have a few days off before the busiest season starts. At the moment it is hot and dry, the grapes develop and we’re on a good path. Let’s see how 2019 turns out!

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